Because I said so: The vaccination debate and a waning trust in science

Because I said so: The vaccination debate and a waning trust in science

Written By Dr. Erika E. Alexander A few weeks ago, I opened my Facebook page to find a war in progress. Shared posts from CNN, Time Magazine, the New York Times, and a wide variety of blogs about vaccination and the “anti-vaxxer” movement littered my timeline.  Each post by members of my highly educated, scientist-heavy … Continue reading

I’m a scientist, so I’m sensitive about my data: The creativity within STEM

I’m a scientist, so I’m sensitive about my data: The creativity within STEM

“The Neuron”.  Artwork by Mental Traffic Written By Dr. Erika E. Alexander Sometimes I think about the moment I decided studying science was for me. I was a freshman in college. It wasn’t because I particularly liked math or analyzing data, or being cooped up in a science lab all day/night (because that’s what scientists … Continue reading

Will actions speak louder than words in the ongoing STEM discussion?

Will actions speak louder than words in the ongoing STEM discussion?

Written by Dr. Stacy-Ann Allen Ramdial Over the last 10 years the acronym STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) has become a buzzword in many circles. Is it possible that like many pop culture expressions,  the clever acronym-word duality that is “STEM” will fade into obscurity once its use (or misuse) has been exhausted? STEM … Continue reading

Beyond “The Pipeline”: Reframing Science’s Diversity Challenge

Written by Dr. Kenneth Gibbs Jr. One of the most commonly used metaphors for describing the solution for growing and diversifying America’s scientific talent pool is the “STEM pipeline.” Major policy reports have called on the U.S. to enlarge it so it does not fall behind other nations. Scholars and the popular press have highlighted the … Continue reading

When Life Gives You Lemons, Build a Lemonade Factory

When Life Gives You Lemons, Build a Lemonade Factory

Written By Dr. Monica F. Cox Turn on the television, read social media posts, or talk to almost anyone affiliated with a technical field in the United States. Front and center is bleak news about the state of minorities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. From a recent American Institutes for Research report … Continue reading

From HeLa to Henrietta: Recognizing the humanity in genetic material

From HeLa to Henrietta: Recognizing the humanity in genetic material

Written by Dr. Erika E. Alexander, PhD On August 27, 2014, the National Institute of Health (NIH) released an update to the current guidelines for scientists who receive NIH funding to study genomics. In the new policy, the NIH mandates that all funded data in genomics be posted online with the intent that the information … Continue reading